Current Location:Home > CHINA AUTO POLICY >

Beijing VI Standards and National VI Standards ,A Great Hurdle for Auto-manufacturers

Date:04-29 16:47 Source:21st Century Business Herald Authour:Cui Yujiao

Beijing VI Standards and National VI Standards ,A Great Hurdle for Auto-manufacturers

The resulting substantial discrepancies between the two emission standards mean that many auto-manufacturers are unable to comply with both standards, and this has given rise to an ongoing debate. At the 2016 China Auto Forum, many insiders reckoned that the variance in these automobile emission standards will impose great pressure on auto manufacturers in terms of technology upgrading and future products.

A substantial gap in terms of emissions limits between the National VI Standards and the Beijing VI Standards makes it tough for many auto-manufacturers to comply with both. The result is an ongoing debate.

Stricter laws and regulations on emissions can always be fully justified for the purposes of energy conservation, emissions reduction, and environmental protection. However, the need for laws and regulations does not justify distorting a unified national market, nor an indifference to the realities of development in the auto industry.

During China Auto Forum 2016, participants raised a series of concerns in a forum session on April 26th entitled “The Auto Industry under the great challenge of Environmental Protection”.

According to figures released by the Ministry of Environmental Protection, National VI Standards will place a further restriction on the emissions limits of oxynitride and PM (particulate matter), with an overall objective of a 30% reduction against the levels set by National V Standards. With a 40% reduction, the limit fixed by Beijing VI Standards is recognized as the most rigorous in the world. The National VI Standards are based on the relevant European regulations while the Beijing VI Standards are based on the US regulations that apply in the State of California.

The resulting substantial discrepancies between the two emission standards mean that many auto-manufacturers are unable to comply with both standards, and this has given rise to an ongoing debate. At the 2016 China Auto Forum, many insiders reckoned that the variance in these automobile emission standards will impose great pressure on auto manufacturers in terms of technology upgrading and future products.

Chai Yongquan, the chief engineer of Cummins (China), commented that according to the National VI Standards, turbo chargers and upgraded systems will need to be introduced to auto engines, which will require changes to the design of both the interior of the cylinder and the cylinder block. In addition, more sensors will have to be added to the single-sensor system, and suspended particle sensors will be required. The resulting system design is not straightforward, and in particular the on-board diagnostics. Ultimately the customers will end up paying for the additional R&D costs, which will double at least.

Wu Jian, the Executive Vice-President of GAC research institute, stated that the biggest difference between the National VI Standards and the Beijing VI Standards does not lies in the testing standards, but in the methods required by auto manufacturers to create the necessary technical processes. The cost to the auto manufacturers of developing two separate technical solutions for one product would be prohibitive, which presents them with a dilemma.

“Clear laws and regulations and unified standards can greatly reduce the cost of product development to vehicle manufacturers,” said Chai Yongquan.

From technology sourcing to commercial production, a lengthy development period is unavoidable. Generally speaking, for a new vehicle this period will last 3 to 6 months, according to Wu Jian. In the development process, new control technology and new rolling and skidding optimization in compliance with the National VI Standards must be taken into consideration and be tackled first. This kind of technology is still in the hands of some suppliers rather than the finished vehicle manufacturers, which will prolong the development period.

Quite a few auto engine manufacturers point out that in the face of a constant barrage of new and changing standards, it is very hard for many enterprises to keep pace. Some insiders suggest that the supervision department and the industry association should work out a rational time schedule for new vehicle standards. The Euro VI standards were not rushed through; they were introduced in 3 phases in a process of cooperation between the ACEA and the standard setters.

Considering the big difference between the per capita GDP of China, some 8,000 US dollars, and that of the developed European countries - about 30,000 -40,000US dollars - it is questionable whether the Euro VI Standards and the National VI Standards (and the even higher standards in megacities) can be realized in China.


©copyright 2015 autochina.comnews.cn